Dr Brady Robards

Brady Robards is a Lecturer in Sociology at Monash University in the School of Social Sciences. Prior to this he was Associate Lecturer in Sociology at Griffith University (2011-2012) and Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Tasmania (2013-2016). His research explores how young people use and thus produce digital social media, such as Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Snapchat, and Reddit. Brady’s recent research focuses on the role of social media as archives of memory, made up of digital traces of life over years of use. Brady also studies social media use among particular groups (LGBTIQ+ people, high school students, and tourists) and is interested in research methods involving social media (‘scrolling back’ with research participants, friending participants, and incorporating visual media into qualitative analysis).

Brady is a member of the Association of Internet Researchers and an Executive Member of the Australian Sociological Association. Brady’s research on social media use appears in journals such as SociologyNew Media & SocietyYoung, Continuum and Social Media + Society, and books such as the Civic Media Reader (MIT Press), and Negotiating Digital Citizenship (Rowman & Littlefield). Brady’s own books include Youth & Society (4th edition, with Rob White and Johanna Wyn by Oxford University Press, 2017), Youth Cultures & Subcultures: Australian Perspectives (with Sarah Baker and Bob Buttigieg, by Routledge, 2015), Mediated Youth Cultures (with Andy Bennett, by Palgrave, 2014) and Teaching Youth Studies Through Popular Culture (with Sarah Baker, by ACYS Publishing, 2014).

Brady has been teaching in higher education since 2007, with expertise in sociology, cultural studies, youth studies, and internet research. Brady’s teaching has been recognised through awards and citations at the University of Tasmania and Griffith University.

Brady currently supervises and is available for further research supervision in the following areas:

  • Digital social media use
  • Sociology of youth
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Digital research methods