Biography

Dr Liz Conor joined the National Centre for Australian Studies in September 2011, as a Lecturer following an Australian Research Council postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Culture and Communications at the University of Melbourne. She is former editor of Metro Magazine and Australian Screen Education and has published essays and freelance articles in the The Age, The Australian, The Sydney Morning Herald, Arena, Overland, Metro, Sydney Child, The Drum, and in a range of academic journals. Liz completed her doctorate in Australian cultural history at La Trobe University and writes regularly on gender, history and politics in the press and scholarly publications.

Liz has taught at the Australian National University and La Trobe University.

Liz’s research interests include print media, popular types and classificatory systems, gender and modernity and representations of Aboriginal women and children. Liz’s doctoral thesis examined Australia’s Modern Girl, particularly the Flapper and the new forms of feminine visibility made possible through urbanization and industrialized image production. Liz’s scholarly articles have been published inArenaOverlandMetro, the Journal of Australian StudiesStudies in Australasian CinemaFeminist TheoryLilith, with book chapters in Historicising Whiteness: Transnational Perspectives on the Construction of an Identity,The Modern Girl Around the World: ConsumptionModernityGlobalizationIntellectuals and Publics: Essays on Cultural Theory and Practice.

Professional Memberships and Editorial Positions

Secretary InASA, International Australian Studies Association

Community Engagement

  • Founder, writer and actor (Mrs Bea Wight) in the John Howard Ladies’ Auxiliary Fanclub
  • Presenter and programmer: RadioMama 3CR Community Radio
  • Founder and convenor of The Mothers of Intervention
  • Spokeswoman on Women’s Affairs
  • Senate Candidate for the Victorian Greens
  • Founder and convenor of the Stick with Wik armband and ribbon Campaign for Native Title

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