Dr Susie Protschky

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    Susie Protschky is a Senior Lecturer in Modern History at Monash University, specialising in the Netherlands Indies (colonial Indonesia), with a special focus on visual culture and photography. She currently holds an Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (ARC APD) (2010-2015). She also coordinates the Honours Program in International Studies at Monash.

    Susie obtained her PhD in History from the University of New South Wales (2007), and a Bachelor of Arts with First Class Honours in Economic History from the University of Sydney (2001).

     Book

    Images of the Tropics: Environment and Visual Culture in Colonial Indonesia

    Susie Protschky, Images of the Tropics: Environment and Visual Culture in Colonial Indonesia (Leiden: KITLV Press/Brill, 2011).  

    Images of the Tropics critically examines Dutch colonial culture in the Netherlands Indies through the prism of landscape art. Susie Protschky contends that visual representations of nature and landscape were core elements of how Europeans understood the tropics, justified their territorial claims in the region, and understood their place both in imperial Europe and in colonized Asia during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Her book thus makes a significant contribution to studies of empire, art and environment, as well as to histories of Indonesia and Europe.

    For a sample chapter and supplier information, visit Brill or KITLV Press.

    New Publications

    Exhibition book

    Exhibition flyer

    Garden of the East: Photography in Indonesia 1850s–1940s

    National Gallery of Australia 21 February – 22 June 2014

    visit http://nga.gov.au/GardenEast/ for more information

    Chapters

    Susie Protschky, ‘Personal albums from early twentieth-century Indonesia’ in Gael Newton (ed.), Garden of the East: Photography in Indonesia 1850s–1940s (Canberra: National Gallery of Australia, 2014), pp. 48-55.

    Short entries

    Susie Protschky, ‘Herman Salzwedel, antiquity and the camera’ in Gael Newton (ed.), Garden of the East: Photography in Indonesia 1850s–1940s (Canberra: National Gallery of Australia, 2014), pp. 68-69.

    Susie Protschky, ‘George Lewis and Mooi Indië art’ in Gael Newton (ed.), Garden of the East: Photography in Indonesia 1850s–1940s (Canberra: National Gallery of Australia, 2014), pp. 74-75.

    Book Chapter

    Book cover

    Susie Protschky, ‘Environment and visual culture in the tropics: The Netherlands Indies, c. 1830–1949’ in Robert Aldrich and Kirsten McKenzie (eds), The Routledge History of Western Empires (London: Routledge, 2013), 382-95.

    For other chapters in this volume, reviews and supplier information, visit the Routledge webpage.

    Forthcoming

    Edited Volume

    Photography, Modernity and the Governed: Re-viewing the ‘Ethical’ Era in Late-Colonial Indonesia (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, forthcoming October 2014).

    With essays by Susie Protschky, Jean Gelman Taylor, Karen Strassler, Rudolf Mrázek, Henk Schulte Nordholt, Pamela Pattynama, Joost Coté, Paul Bijl.

    This collection entails a significant new study of the period encompassed by the Ethical Policy (c. 1900–1942), a program of welfare, education and infrastructural reform initiated by the Dutch colonial administration of the Netherlands Indies (now the Republic of Indonesia). The Ethical Policy has received little attention beyond the specialist literature on Dutch imperialism, despite its resonance with French notions of a colonial ‘civilising mission’ and British concepts of the ‘white man’s burden’. This book will be the first English-language study of the policy, and the first to examine ‘ethical’ ways of seeing through the lens of the camera, an instrument that was embraced with enthusiasm by a range of social classes and ethnic groups in late-colonial Indonesia. In doing so, these essays shed new light on historical understandings of debates that were conducted in images about Indonesian modernities, civilisation and being governed in the early twentieth century.